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Corporate Workplace Branding of Strategic Advisors Firm

David Shopper

 

David Shopper

David’s candid workplace photography puts grey matter front and center.

 

It’s a shame to work hard on a project that barely sees the light of day.  Then again, maybe it’s a testament to how valuable the project really is.

In a previous blog post, I talk about work I’ve done for Boston boutique consulting firm Bulger Vogel.  Great client.  A bunch of intense shoots.  Captivating imagery.  But I’ve never seen the final results until today, when I checked out their ad agency’s website.

Bulger Vogel’s corporate website was gone before I could see it.  The reason?  Behemoth Ernst-Young bought the  firm to incorporate it into their monster offering.  This was probably the hoped-for outcome of our rebrand, and it warms my heart that Bulger Vogel was able to leverage the photography in this way.  A moderate investment for a huge payoff.

The screen grabs above show what the short-lived website looks like.  The graphic design is great.  I love the way the design elements frame and intensify the imagery.

This project is a collaboration with two agencies: Create + Conquer and Xavinci.  Xavinci is showcasing this shoot on their website, which you can see here.  Referring to their role as art directors of the shoots, Xavinci says:

Bulger Vogel wanted to have authenticity to their brand imagery. All the images captured are of employees actively engaged in work, to illustrate how they deliver for their clients and to convey a collaborative culture of the firm.”

When you get right down to it, authenticity, collaboration, and engagement is what every company wants to project.  But you can show these themes in different ways.  The visuals can be complex or simple.  Colorful or monochromatic.  Up-close or removed.  None of these styles is good nor bad – they just have to work with the marketing to define the message convincingly.  Good website photography is consistent, graphic, and adheres to the message.  It’s always the message that should define the photography, not the other way around.